Cassowaries Home Expanded

May 2nd, 2012

Volunteers from Rainforest Rescue, Terrain, Community for Coastal and Cassowary Conservation (C4), Girringun Aboriginal Rangers, Conservation Volunteers Australia and Cassowary Coast Regional Council assisted in the planting of 600 native rainforest tree species at Mission Beach to restore critical Cassowary habitat

Funding provided by Rainforest Rescue has seen the first 600 trees planted on Friday 27th April as part of an important revegetation project to restore a critical Cassowary corridor that was damaged by Cyclone Yasi in 2011. The corridor will link two large areas of Cassowary habitat at a rural property in Mission Beach.

Project partner Terrain NRM managed the tree planting event which saw teams of nearly 50 volunteers plant about 600 native rainforest trees.

The high density of Cassowaries at Mission Beach means the restoration of rainforest corridors, which provide them with habitat, food and safe passage, is crucial to the survival of the endangered species.

Terrain’s Mission Beach Local Area Planner Tony O’Malley said this particular site was specifically chosen for the project, as it was identified as being one of the rainforest corridors most in need of revegetation.

A variety of tree species were planted with a particular focus on Cassowary food trees such as quandongs, lilly pillies and Bandicoot Berries.

The trees were planted by a collaboration of volunteers from Rainforest Rescue, Terrain, Community for Coastal and Cassowary Conservation (C4), Girringun Aboriginal Rangers, Conservation Volunteers Australia and Cassowary Coast Regional Council.

Terrain will maintain the site including weed management and dependant on subsequent rainfall, water the trees.

A further 800 trees will be planted on the property in the coming months.

Terrain is also consulting with local landholders to identify other potential sites for Cassowary habitat restoration.

Mr O’Malley said, “I’m aware of quite a few landholders in the region who are willing to participate in the restoration of Cassowary habitat if they are supported by organisations such as Terrain and Rainforest Rescue.”

Rainforest Rescue’s CEO and Founding Director, Kelvin Davies said, “Following Cyclone Yasi we had a significant response from the community. In particular we received wonderful support from the Mazda Foundation, North Queensland Wildlife Trust and the Taronga Zoo Foundation.”

He said, “We are particularly proud to be funding such a collaborative approach to rainforest restoration for Cassowary habitat recovery in Mission Beach. We look forward to working with Terrain over the coming years.”

Rainforest Rescue is a national not-for-profit organisation and Terrain, also not-for-profit, supports natural resource management in the Wet Tropics region.

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